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Typos in septa ridership

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Nathan Bergey 1 year ago
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      src/posts/septa_ridership.md

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src/posts/septa_ridership.md

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ published_date: 2021-09-26 00:00:00 +0000
slug: septa_ridership
is_draft: false
description: |
Philadelphia's tranist agency septa publishes yearly line-by-line breakdowns
Philadelphia's transit agency septa publishes yearly line-by-line breakdowns
of ridership and revenue stats which we can take and get a sense of how
septa operates.
data:
@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ table tbody tr:hover {
_Published in September 2021_
<p class="illuminated">
Philadelphia's tranist agency <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa</span>{% capture sidenote %}Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority.{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} publishes yearly line-by-line breakdowns of ridership and revenue stats{% capture sidenote %}Full statistics for each route were previously published at http://septa.org/strategic-plan/reports.html though that page has since been removed. It's still avaliable on <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20200803144310/https://septa.org/strategic-plan/reports.html">archive.org</a>.{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} which we can take and get a sense of how <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa</span> operates.
Philadelphia's transit agency <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa</span>{% capture sidenote %}Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority.{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} publishes yearly line-by-line breakdowns of ridership and revenue stats{% capture sidenote %}Full statistics for each route were previously published at http://septa.org/strategic-plan/reports.html though that page has since been removed. It's still avaliable on <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20200803144310/https://septa.org/strategic-plan/reports.html">archive.org</a>.{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} which we can take and get a sense of how <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa</span> operates.
</p>
@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ For every bus, trolley, and train, <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa<
## What Are The Most Popular Lines
Using thise data we can look at all routes with at least 10,000 weekday average riders:
Using this data we can look at all routes with at least 10,000 weekday average riders:
@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ Using thise data we can look at all routes with at least 10,000 weekday average
One thing that really strikes me is just how many more people the two subway{% capture sidenote %}I'm just going to say "subway" to refer to both the MFL and BSL for convienence{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} lines cary compared to anything else in the system!
One thing that really strikes me is just how many more people the two subway{% capture sidenote %}I'm just going to say "subway" to refer to both the MFL and BSL for convienence{% endcapture %}{% include "sidenote.liquid" %} lines carry compared to anything else in the system!
### Median Ridership By Vehicle Type
@ -276,7 +276,7 @@ In general both costs and revenue scale with how many people ride a route. The b
</figure>
But notice that mode matters. Here the regional rail (blue) costs are sigificantly higer than the bus (red) baseline.
But notice that mode matters. Here the regional rail (blue) costs are sigificantly higher than the bus (red) baseline.
However in 2019 <span style="font-variant:small-caps;">septa</span> had a entierly different fare structure for regional rail than for busses or trollies. The rail system was zoned so longer trips cost more. If instead we look at the operating ratio&mdash;i.e., how much money a line makes compared to its cost&mdash;we see that the mode split goes away, and that there is much less of a correlation with ridership.

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